2017 Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism Undergraduate Research Excellence Awards

July 17, 2017

We are pleased to announce the winners of the 2017 Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism (APNM) Undergraduate Research Excellence Awards. This awards series is presented by Canadian Science Publishing (CSP) in partnership with the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology and the Canadian Nutrition Society.

The awards series recognizes outstanding senior undergraduate students who are enrolled in exercise science and nutrition major programs at participating Canadian universities and colleges. The awards are presented on an annual basis. 

The submission and selection procedures are determined by the awarding institution (e.g., the student’s home department) but typically, nominations are put forward by the eligible student’s supervisor. The awards recognize excellence in research and are thus linked to some aspect of an independent or self-directed learning research project such as a final-year thesis. Once nominations have been made to the department, the final selection of each award recipient is made by the student’s home department. The department selects only one award recipient per eligible department per year. The deadline of selection of the award recipient is by April 30th of each year. 

APNM established the awards to recognize excellence in up-and-coming Canadian researchers by profiling the research of exceptional students and providing them with the opportunity to be more involved with the journal and with the field as a whole. 

The 12 winners for 2017 have each received a certificate of recognition and have been granted free electronic access to APNM for one year. Winners have been invited to blog about their research—keep an eye out for their posts.

Congratulations to the 2017 winners!

Nicholas Preobrazenski
School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen’s University 
"Prescribing and guiding exercise intensity using the talk test"

Amariah Kathol
Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta
"Prenatal exercise and miscarriage: a meta-analysis of randomized control trials"

Robyn Madden
Department of Health and Physical Education, Mount Royal University
"Evaluation of dietary intakes and supplement use in Paralympic athletes"

Tristan Dorey
School of Health and Human Performance, Dalhousie University
"Can knee-high compression socks minimize blood pooling and stroke volume decreases during head-up tilt following exercise?"

Jennifer Lee 
School of Nutrition, Ryerson University 
"Effects of potatoes and other carbohydrates consumed at breakfast on cognition, glycaemia and satiety in children"

Arianne Morissette 
School of Nutrition Sciences, University of Ottawa 
"The effect of fruits polyphenols on the gut microbiota and metabolic health"

Lindsey Bigg 
Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph 
"Pre-practice hydration status, sweat rates, salt loss and drinking habits of varsity football players"

Sumeyya Tegally 
Kinesiology, University of Guelph-Humber 
"The effects of blood flow restriction on EMG activity, fatigue and rehabilitation exercises"

Katherine Adamski 
Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph 
"The association between protein consumption at breakfast and body composition in preschool-age children"

Rachel Kays 
Department of Applied Human Sciences, University of Prince Edward Island
"The effects of social media on food intake and behaviour"

Caroline Anderson 
Department of Applied Human Nutrition, Mount Saint Vincent University 
"Eating disorders, muscle dysmorphia, and exercise dependence among competitive male bodybuilders in Nova Scotia: an exploratory pilot study"

Angélina Lacroix
Faculté des sciences de l'activité physique, Université de Sherbrooke 
"Le rôle des fréquences thêta et bêta dans l'encodage des rétroactions positives et négatives dans une tâche de pointage avec électroencéphalographie"

Filed Under: Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism

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