CSP Open: A new and exciting adventure!

March 02, 2015

By Tanya Samman


This is the first of a series of posts chronicling Canadian Science Publishing's development of a new multidisciplinary open access journal.

I began my journey at Canadian Science Publishing as a Scientific Publishing Associate more than 8 months ago —time flies!! In an earlier post I mentioned that there had been some new and exciting developments for me, and now I finally get to start telling you all about it!

The big buzz in research and scholarly publishing circles is currently all about open access (OA). At its heart, OA is all about free and unrestricted access to the products of research for anyone and everyone. It is causing a dramatic shift in the landscape of scholarly publishing, and we at CSP are doing our best to keep up with the changes and provide the best possible publishing options for Canadian and international researchers.

Our authors have choice in how to make their work OA. Currently we offer an OpenArticle service to authors publishing in 16 of the NRC Research Press journals, and all authors who publish in any CSP journal may at any time in the publication process self-archive their submitted and/or accepted manuscript on their institution's website or in an open-access repository, thereby satisfying the requirements of green OA.

In December 2014 CSP launched our first fully open access journal Arctic Science, and it was then that I wrapped up my last duties as a Scientific Publishing Associate. CSP’s next step is to create a high quality multidisciplinary —and uniquely Canadian—publishing platform. We are in the beginning stages of development and are working with stakeholders from research and publishing communities in Canada to build a comprehensive, sustainable, open access platform that serves the needs of Canadian (and international) researchers and respects the fundamental principles of open access.

My new job? Coordinator of this new journal, to be published as part of CSP Open initiatives! My role right now is to help get the journal up and running, and after it launches I’ll be coordinating both the submission/peer review and production processes. It is exciting to be in on something like this from the ground up, but there is lots of work to be done! And I’ll be sharing our journey with you…

In order to fulfill our mandate of best-serving the needs of researchers and the scholarly community, we need to involve members of those communities in our process. We want to make sure we do this right! We felt it was important to meet with stakeholders to solicit feedback while the plan is still flexible and can be modified as needed to meet the needs of the community.

To this end we convened a one-day meeting in Ottawa in early February with a variety of stakeholders including university and government researchers, librarians, independent scholars, science communicators, and publishing consultants, to go over our proposals for various aspects of the project. Representatives from NSERC also contributed to the discussion, and spoke about the new Tri-Agency OA Policy on Publications that was formally announced last week.

Here are some photos taken during our discussions:

From left to right:  M. Duquet (CHA and CALJ); C. Macdonald (CSP); D. Georganas (NSERC); M.-C. Williamson (NRCan-GSC); L. Venier (NRCan-CFS); K. Stapelfeldt (U of T Scarborough), M. Vanbuskirk (MVB Editing; meeting facilitator); T. Irving (Science Communicator). 



From left to right: nbsp;C. Macdonald (CSP); K. Fitzgibbons (NSERC); D. Georganas (NSERC); L. Venier (NRCan-CFS); K. Stapelfeldt (U of T Scarborough),



From left to right: M. Duquet (CHA and CALJ); C. Macdonald (CSP); D. Georganas (NSERC); M.-C. Williamson (NRCan-GSC); L. Venier (NRCan-CFS); K. Stapelfeldt (U of T Scarborough), M. Vanbuskirk (MVB Editing; meeting facilitator); L. Aarssen (Queen's University); J. Dupuis (York University); T. Irving (Science Communicator); D. Baldwin (Publishing Consultant).



From left to right: J. Dupuis (York University); T. Irving (Science Communicator); D. Baldwin (Publishing Consultant); S. Kettley (CSP); S. Normandin (Independent Scholar).


It was a lively and productive discussion, and gave us much to think about as well as affirming our approach. We also received feedback from a few researchers who were unable to attend the meeting in person. Many excellent insights were shared!

With this information in hand, we are forming internal teams to work on implementation strategies for the different aspects of the project. Stay tuned for updates!

Oh, and I bet you’re dying to know what our new journal will be called!
Well, that’s what I’ll be talking about in my next post…




About Tanya

Tanya Samman (@T_S_Sci) has a multidisciplinary background and brings an interdisciplinary approach to all her pursuits. She received her B.Sc. and M.Sc. from the University of Toronto, and her Ph.D. from the University of Calgary, specializing in paleontology and geology. Her research interests include palaeoecology and functional morphology/biomechanics. Tanya is interested not only in the research aspect of science, but also in science education, outreach, and communication. She volunteers her time with several organizations and has participated in activities that include mentoring, classroom visits, field trips, presenting talks, setting up and staffing palaeontology and geology booths/tables for public events, and presenting research through the media. She has taught introductory geology and scientific literacy courses and is an alumna of the Banff Science Communications program. (Photo credit: Scott Rowed)


About Tanya

Tanya Samman (@T_S_Sci) has a multidisciplinary background and brings an interdisciplinary approach to all her pursuits. She received her B.Sc. and M.Sc. from the University of Toronto, and her Ph.D. from the University of Calgary, specializing in paleontology and geology. Her research interests include palaeoecology and functional morphology/biomechanics. Tanya is interested not only in the research aspect of science, but also in science education, outreach, and communication. She volunteers her time with several organizations and has participated in activities that include mentoring, classroom visits, field trips, presenting talks, setting up and staffing palaeontology and geology booths/tables for public events, and presenting research through the media. She has taught introductory geology and scientific literacy courses and is an alumna of the Banff Science Communications program. (Photo credit: Scott Rowed)

About Tanya

Tanya Samman (@T_S_Sci) has a multidisciplinary background and brings an interdisciplinary approach to all her pursuits. She received her B.Sc. and M.Sc. from the University of Toronto, and her Ph.D. from the University of Calgary, specializing in paleontology and geology. Her research interests include palaeoecology and functional morphology/biomechanics. Tanya is interested not only in the research aspect of science, but also in science education, outreach, and communication. She volunteers her time with several organizations and has participated in activities that include mentoring, classroom visits, field trips, presenting talks, setting up and staffing palaeontology and geology booths/tables for public events, and presenting research through the media. She has taught introductory geology and scientific literacy courses and is an alumna of the Banff Science Communications program. (Photo credit: Scott Rowed)


Filed Under: FACETS Scholarly Publishing Open Access Science News Tanya Samman

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