In the News

Recent news articles about CSP and research published in our journals...

CBC News Halifax profiles new research published in the journal Botany focusing on Nova Scotian populations of the globally endangered Boreal felt lichen. Despite conservation efforts, the lichen is predicted to decline by almost 50% in the next 25 years. The decline is attributed to acid rain and other environmental changes in the regions the lichen is endemic to.

Read More »

shadow border

Covered by the CBC, the Huffington Post, CTV News, and more, the 2016 ParticipACTION Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth indicates that Canadian children are sleeping for an insufficient amount of time. This report was based on academic papers published in a special issue of APNM.

Read More »

shadow border

The Edmonton Journal profiles the research done by University of Alberta professor Stewart Petersen, a guest editor for the recent special issue of Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism. The special issue investigates current research into physical employment standards and highlights the large questions the field must address moving forward.

Read More »

shadow border

A report in the Vancouver Sun highlights research published in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences that suggests floodgates are associated with a lower abundance of native fish species and a higher abundance of invasive fish species in the lower Fraser River.

Read More »

shadow border

Both the CBC and the Globe and Mail report on an Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism study indicating the salt content changes of various foods in 2013, three years after Health Canada implemented a strategy to reduce sodium consumption in Canadians. Only 16% of food categories saw a decrease in salt levels in those three years. The majority of foods had no change in sodium levels, and some categories even experienced an increase in salt.

Read More »

shadow border

There is growing hope that the once decimated northern cod stock is making a slow, but steady comeback, according to a new study that found the iconic species is growing in size and number off Newfoundland. George Rose, the report’s co-author, said acoustic surveys last spring indicated that the fish were getting bigger and more plentiful after 23 years of a government-imposed moratorium and halting growth.

Read More »

shadow border

The cod is coming back. The species that was for centuries a mainstay of the American and Canadian economies had virtually vanished off the Northeastern North American coast by the 1990s owing to overfishing. That led regulators in 1992 to impose a moratorium on cod fishing. It appears to have worked.

Read More »

shadow border

The Haida Gwaii of 57,000 years ago was likely covered with tundra and low meadows populated by grazing mammals including caribou and mammoths, according to new research from Simon Fraser University. The most abundant of the dung-eating fungi found in a layer of peat dated to the end of the second to last ice age have previously been found in other sites on the dung of large herbivores.

Read More »

shadow border

A new report by Canadian scientists says that while Canada has well-intentioned policies for protecting endangered marine species, they simply aren't working. Dr. Julia Baum, a marine biologist from the University of Victoria, and her colleagues investigated how the two mechanisms meant to protect marine wildlife, the Species at Risk Act, and Fisheries & Oceans Canada's management plans, were working. They discovered that they weren't working, thanks to a combination of bureaucratic delays, political indifference and abrogation of legal responsibilities, that left most species effectively unprotected.

Read More »

shadow border

Protein is the key to keeping cravings at bay, building lean muscle and dropping those last few pounds. But according to a new review published in Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, it’s not just how much protein you eat that’s important: It's where you get your protein that also matters. The reason is threefold. First of all, every source of protein -- from chicken to peanuts -- contains a different array of amino acids, the building blocks of protein. Of the 20 various amino acids, nine are “essential,” meaning you can only get them from food. So it’s especially important you get enough of those guys.

Read More »

shadow border

Breakfast, athletes have long been told, is the most important meal of the day. And lunch and dinner aren’t far behind. But what about the before-bed snack? A pair of new studies offer contrasting views on how you can boost your strength or endurance by either adding or subtracting evening calories, so that your muscles remain in a heightened state of adaptation while you sleep. While the effects are subtle, they illustrate an often-neglected fitness rule: Sometimes when you eat is almost as important as what you eat.

Read More »

shadow border

Last year, for the first time, scientists used an unmanned aerial vehicle, or UAV, to study killer whales from above. In an article published this month in the Journal of Unmanned Vehicle Systems, scientists describe how they configured their UAV, turning it into a precision scientific instrument. The international team of scientists from NOAA Fisheries and the Vancouver Aquarium used the UAV to take straight-down photos of the Northern resident killer whales, a group of animals that frequent waters near Vancouver Island, British Columbia, and that are listed as threatened under Canada’s Species At Risk Act.

Read More »

shadow border

It’s the closest thing to Jurassic Park, a wooded bluff on the Tsawwassen First Nation lands that is home to B.C’s largest great blue heron nesting colony. Hundreds of them fly overhead like pterodactyls, distinguished by their hoarse, raucous calls, hunched silhouettes and outstretched wings. “It’s really something special, very prehistoric,” agrees Rob Butler, a former federal bird researcher who is now president of Pacific Wildlife Foundation.

Read More »

shadow border

In January, the Royal Canadian Geographic Society asked Canadians to join in on a contest to name Canada’s national bird – something this country is said to be sadly lacking. This being the end of May, it would be more timely, surely, to name Canada’s national insect. And in this contest there is simply no contest. The blackfly. There are more than 100 species of the creatures in Canada. They are in our eyes, our noses and deep inside our ears. They show up in our children’s diapers and in our patio drinks. They are far more ubiquitous than the beaver, the moose or even Canada geese – so how can they not be a national symbol?

Read More »

shadow border

Sea lice could be affecting wild salmon stocks, according to a new study by a Simon Fraser University-led team of researchers that found a link between sea lice infestation and the ability of juvenile sockeye salmon to forage for food. The competitive foraging experiment was conducted in part by Sean Godwin, a doctoral biology student at SFU. Godwin found that highly infected juvenile sockeye salmon were 20 per cent less successful at consuming food, on average, than lightly infected fish.

Read More »

shadow border

The Heart and Stroke Foundation (HSF) has just come out with new guidelines to lower consumption of what they call "added sugar" to no more than 10 per cent -- or ideally 5 per cent -- of total calorie intake per day. That number today is around 13 per cent. This falls in line with the recommendations made by the World Health Organization earlier in the year. The reason for lower levels is that too much sugar is bad for our health and over consumption of sugar, similar to overconsumption of anything, can cause a number of health problems including obesity. The HSF goes on to make a number of recommendations to help lower sugar consumption including higher taxes on sugar sweetened beverages.

Read More »

shadow border